Sunday, August 07, 2016

Pulled Pork with red wine barbecue sauce

The finished pork, with sauce in the back ground
My cousin and her family were coming for a visit, and we wanted something special but informal for a dinner. Especially as they had a long drive, finally through the tangled mess that is Montreal's road repairs. I chose pulled pork and have a little photo essay to accompany it.

The pulled pork itself was purchased the day before. It was a 9lbs butt roast. It was coated with worchestershire(Woos-ta-shire) sauce then mustard.  "Steak spice" was used as a dry rub, patting that on, then finally sprinkling smoked paprika to finish. The entire cut of meat, including any flaps, were coated.

The meat was wrapped in plastic wrap and left to sit over-night in the fridge.

Remove the plastic wrap before you place the pork on a foil wrapped roasting tray, and slip it in the oven.

9lbs of pork requires approximately 9 hours at 250F, so I started early to make sure I could feed the folks when they arrived. In the end, the roast required only 8 hours to reach 190F, at which point it was removed from the oven, wrapped in foil and a couple of clean towels to rest. In this case I left it for 1hour 35mins, but it requires at least an hour to reach maximum juiciness.

While the pork slow roasted, I made the barbecue sauce.
Olive oil and chili flakes on medium low heat

Two large cloves of garlic, mashed flat with the side of a cleaver

Diced fresh ginger

Saute the ginger and garlic

Add a couple of cups of wine. I did this instead
Malt vinegar, bourbon or mustard, which is the
basis of many fine recipes. The wine and ginger
worked very well, and my sone said it tasted a bit
like "asian barbecue".

add a 1/2 cup of brown sugar

Add half teaspoon of smoked paprika

Add a grated carrot. This is a great trick for adding
a subtle sweetness and roundness to recipes. It also
helps tame a sauce if it is too spicy.

Reduce the sauce on medium low to
desired consistency. It took a good
3 hours for this stage. By the end, the carrot
had broken down almost completely into the sauce.

At 4 hours,  'painting' the pork with sauce.

170 degrees at 4 hours! but it took
 another 3 hours to reach 190F

Out of the oven at 8 hours, and 190F
 internal temperature 

Wrap in foil and towel and left rest for an hour.
The meat will retain its heat for several hours
like this, so you can hold it 'til guests arrive.
After resting for an hour and a half, the meat
was beautifully tender and juicy.

Pulled Pork with red wine barbecue sauce

The finished pork, with sauce in the back ground
My cousin and her family were coming for a visit, and we wanted something special but informal for a dinner. Especially as they had a long drive, finally through the tangled mess that is Montreal's road repairs. I chose pulled pork and have a little photo essay to accompany it.

The pulled pork itself was purchased the day before. It was a 9lbs butt roast. It was coated with worchestershire(Woos-ta-shire) sauce then mustard.  "Steak spice" was used as a dry rub, patting that on, then finally sprinkling smoked paprika to finish. The entire cut of meat, including any flaps, were coated.

The meat was wrapped in plastic wrap and left to sit over-night in the fridge.

Remove the plastic wrap before you place the pork on a foil wrapped roasting tray, and slip it in the oven.

9lbs of pork requires approximately 9 hours at 250F, so I started early to make sure I could feed the folks when they arrived. In the end, the roast required only 8 hours to reach 190F, at which point it was removed from the oven, wrapped in foil and a couple of clean towels to rest. In this case I left it for 1hour 35mins, but it requires at least an hour to reach maximum juiciness.

While the pork slow roasted, I made the barbecue sauce.
Olive oil and chili flakes on medium low heat

Two large cloves of garlic, mashed flat with the side of a cleaver

Diced fresh ginger

Saute the ginger and garlic

Add a couple of cups of wine. I did this instead
Malt vinegar, bourbon or mustard, which is the
basis of many fine recipes. The wine and ginger
worked very well, and my sone said it tasted a bit
like "asian barbecue".

add a 1/2 cup of brown sugar

Add half teaspoon of smoked paprika

Add a grated carrot. This is a great trick for adding
a subtle sweetness and roundness to recipes. It also
helps tame a sauce if it is too spicy.

Reduce the sauce on medium low to
desired consistency. It took a good
3 hours for this stage. By the end, the carrot
had broken down almost completely into the sauce.

At 4 hours,  'painting' the pork with sauce.

170 degrees at 4 hours! but it took
 another 3 hours to reach 190F

Out of the oven at 8 hours, and 190F
 internal temperature 

Wrap in foil and towel and left rest for an hour.
The meat will retain its heat for several hours
like this, so you can hold it 'til guests arrive.
After resting for an hour and a half, the meat
was beautifully tender and juicy.

Friday, May 22, 2015

Not as a consumer or producer but rather as a human being

"God created man not as a consumer or producer but rather as a human being. That the means of life should not be the goal of life. That the stomach should not outgrow the head. That life is not exclusively based on the profit motive. That a human being is allotted time in order to have time and not to arrive somewhere faster with his legs than with his heart." -Karl Krause 
from 
The Kraus Project: Essays by Karl Kraus,
translated and annotated by Jonathan Franzen, 



Wednesday, January 15, 2014

2013- we hardly knew ye

2014 starts with me taking a few minutes off to write a blog post, when i should be finishing a conference paper for the Canadian Game Studies Association. I'm in year two of my doctoral studies, and can finally begin to define myself as a Philosopher who studies the aesthetics of digital games and the ontology of play.

The family are doing well, with the boy growing like a weed. The missus is still managing a research group at the MUHC and studying to specialise in human resource management. yes, kiddies, school never stops, training is the new normal. Its generally the fastest way to acquire new skills as the world changes.

What got me writing this morning was the elf-on-a-shelf phenomenon, which is a cute pseudo-tradition that supports a cynical marketing ploy. My wife and I amused ourselves with fun ways to subvert this. Don't buy the elves, make your own. Create stories about hiring unemployed elves that are looking for work after Santa moved his workshop off shore. Have your elf-on-a-shelf engage in anti-social, irresponsible or inappropriate behavior as he vies to become the NSA's "snitch of the year".


Wednesday, May 02, 2012

Those self-entitled students

I'm not talking about the University students in Québec. I'm talking about those ingrates in High School. We know most don't work very hard or apparently learn very much(have you tried reading a 1st year uni student's essay, lately?). So why do we bother paying for public highschool? Let them work, I say, and if they want more than flipping burgers, they can save for high school.

Regardless, at least 1% of the population have the wherewithall to make sure their kids get a decent High School education. So there will be a future generation to lead our people, who are all a bunch of free-loaders, what with their medicare, and subsidised daycare and free elementary education.

At least now parents have to bake cookies and buy most of the children's supplies. It gets those free-loading children and their parents off their lazy asses. Children in some countries go to work. They understand the value of smashing bricks into gravel. And they learn it young, typically age 5.

So why should we pay for university educations? Or any educations? Let the kids pay for their crummy educations.

Oh yeah, we'll pay for their education or the lack off it, one way or the other.

Sunday, October 16, 2011

Occupy Montréal: Why?


Over a thousand people gathered in Victoria Square, the center
of Montreal's financial district, to "Occupy Montréal"
 The Occupy Movement has drawn disparate campaigners for a variety of  causes together. This has caused many to accuse the movement of being directionless or un-serious. In reality the people occupying Wall Street, London and other financial centers around the globe see these institutions as being the source of many global problems. While the previous global recession can immediately be linked to financial and political mismanagement of the economy, protestors also see how environmental concerns, the plight of aboriginal peoples, military actions, the stagnation of middle class incomes, the growth of impoverished underclasses in even the wealthiest nations and the continued success of dictators are all tied to a financial elite that holds undue influence over governments, democratic or not, whether international, national, regional or local.
The interests of a few include the senior executives
of major media and diversified corporations.

In Canada, stricter banking regulations protected our economy from the financial mismanagement that wounded much of the world's economy. However, the current government had advocated removing those restrictions, prior to the recession. Moreover, incomes have stagnated in Canada for more than a generation, although Canadian workers productivity has shown massive gains. Like people around the world, Canadian citizens have to work more and more to earn the same income, and this in an era of massive increase of corporate profit and GDP growth. Coupling this with environmental exploitation, this isn't seen as business development, but as a return a sort of technocratic feudalism. So many Canadians see these protests as the last, best hope for maintaining political and economic justice here and around the world.

Few believe that solutions to balancing human needs, environmental limitations and a sustainable economy will be simple, but all see this elite as being responsive only to its own narrow and short-sighted interests. Even those who consider themselves capitalists do not recognise this as anything but a kleptocracy. A kleptocracy that relies on the political class of various countries to act as partners or shills for policy that benefits the 1% to the detriment of the other 99%.

Certainly, you can find funny hats, and protestors that can only ramble incoherently. But these are a sliver of those that see the far reaching ramifications of a global class that plays Monopoly with the wealth produced by an increasingly disenfranchised majority. And unfortunately some believe that by allying themselves with the "1%" they will be allowed to join it. Yet their loyalty is exploited- we only have to look toward the behavior of some Police forces in their actions toward peaceful protest. But on closer examination the majority of the Occupy movement are citizens demanding democratic representation and economic opportunities that don't rely on onerous exploitation of people or the environment.
The police presence at Occupy Montréal was very visible, but
admirably subdued. For the most part, soldiers and police officers
are part of the 99% as much as these two women.


Monday, September 19, 2011

Fall note

When I finished my M.A. I assumed I would have more time to do things like play music, run and enjoy having my family back together under one roof. In the last case, I have made sure that happened, as best I can, with a strong willed seven-year old. He seems to be surprised when I insist he do his homework, clean up himself and his room, and generally conduct himself as a civilized human being. But I digress.
The demands of even a single child constantly call parents.

None the less I am busy with a PhD application, developing a game and finishing a short video documentary on my friend Christopher MacLeod's sculpture. Add work as a carpenter to keep body and soul minimally funded and I am probably busier than while writing my thesis.

Canada Malt, a derelict factory on the Lachine Canal, near my home.
Occasionally, my guitar is strummed, and I'll sketch an image, rather than a mind map. Most of my time is now spent on the practical demands of theoretical thought and scholarship. But I will return now and then to put a few thoughts here. You can also search around for my more professionally-(hate that word) focused blogs.

 
"If I had to choose between betraying my country and betraying my friend, I hope I should have the guts to betray my country."
-E.M. Forster